What Is The Definition Of “Juxtaposition?”

Juxtaposition is a writing device in which two things (places, ideas, or characters and their actions) are put side by side in the prose or poem in order to compare or contrast them with each other.

This useful technique helps to portray characters in detail to create tension. A writer might place a good character alongside an evil character; the juxtaposition of the evil character’s malevolent tendencies against the benevolent traits of the good character will highlight such benevolent traits much better than it would if the writer merely portrayed the good character’s qualities alone. But this is not Staten Island Law, juxtaposition can be used in many different ways.

Examples Of Juxtaposition In Classic Literature

“Paradise Lost”: John Milton’s poem “Paradise Lost” is a classic example of juxtaposition. Two characters “God and Satan” are portrayed side by side, with the traits of each character made more obvious when compared with each other. Because of the contrast between Satan’s bad qualities and God’s good qualities, the reader can easily reach the conclusion that Satan was deserving of being banned from paradise for not submitting to God’s will.

“A Tale of Two Cities”: In this Charles Dickens tale of the French Revolution, the opening paragraph immediately contrasts the best and worst of the socio-economic climate of the times by speaking of wisdom and foolishness, Light and Darkness, hope and despair. This highlights the dichotomy in the story to come, in which the chasm between the “haves” and the “have-nots” becomes too vast to cross, setting the stage for revolution.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

Uses Of Juxtaposition

Writers use the literary device of juxtaposition to pique the reader’s interest, drawing a comparison between two contrary things by placing them side by side. The comparison creates a vivid picture in the reader’s mind and can control the pace of a poem or narrative by offering a sensible connection between two ambiguous ideas.