The Most Erotic Poems Ever Written

Poetry has long been a medium for which to direct our innermost thoughts to others who might be feeling something similar–or something different. Pen to paper is one of the greatest ways of exploring the taboo, the unthinkable, or the things we most want to have but can’t. Some of these poems are violent, some are sensual, some are erotic or sexual, tantalizing, dirty or timid. Here are a few of the most erotic poems ever written!

  1. Anne Carson told The Autobiography of Red, an unusual love story based on mythology. The story follows the “monster” Geryon who was sexually abused by an older brother. Geryon finally finds release through Herakles, although the love affair is not without its ups and downs. Who doesn’t love a good homoerotic romance with ambiguous literal or figurative monsters thrown in for good measure?
  2. Pablo Neruda was a Chilean poet known for his love poems, including “Every Day You Play.” This poem is savage and sensual, and blatantly erotic. It’s also one of the most beautiful and well-written poems you’ll ever read. “The rain takes off her clothes. / The birds go by, fleeing. / The wind. The wind.” This one is well worth the adventure.
  3. Anne Reeve Aldrich was a talented American poet, who wrote “Servitude.” It’s worth a read, as are her other works in The Rose of Flame. Like many popular poets, she found greater prominence after an early death at the age of 26.
  4. To a Dark Moses” was written by African American Lucille Clifton, a poet and writer. She gained much renown during her 73 year life, and almost won two Pulitzer Prizes in poetry. Her publication of “homage to my hips” was a rare work of art that helped women–and African American women in particular–find freedom in sexual expression through power and understanding.
  5. Audre Lorde was known as a source of pride for lesbian feminism as an activist and writer. She gave us “Recreation,” sensual and sexual as it is. She’s also well known for her common expression of outrage at the state of civil rights during her life. She grew up in the 30s and 40s and passed away in 1992. She identified as a poet, mother, feminist, African American, and lesbian, although she was careful not to allow any one identity overtake another. She wanted to use those parts of herself to bring others together in celebration of differences.