Paradise Lost: Analysis

The poem “Paradise Lost” is built around the premise of God, his creations, and man’s disobedience.

It takes a look at the way God’s creations were disobedient and how it came back to create a trail of events that are now etched into history. This is the premise of the poem, and it branches out from there using principal characters such as Satan.

This analysis will dive deeper into why the poem was penned, its main intentions, and how it was able to relay these convictions through the written word.

Hierarchy

In general, most readers will take a look at the development of disobedience as seen with Adam and Eve.

This is normal and is a big part of the poem, but there is more to the context in place. This is where it is time to start looking at the causes of these realities and why they came to be.

For example, everything is structured based on hierarchy.

This includes heaven, hell, God’s place, and the rest of his creations. Everything is in place for a reason, and if something disturbs this order, it tends to lead to a lost paradise.

For those who do obey God, they are respecting the hierarchal setup that’s in place.

This is why Satan’s disobedience is seen as the most significant turning point in biblical history. This was the first creation that let God down and continued to do so forever. There were no external pressures or anything of that sort in his way.

Everything was done at his own volition.

Fortunate Disobedience

With Adam and Eve, the disobedience is present, but it is viewed differently.

For example, it is seen as one that is great because it highlights the hierarchy and where humans stand. Those who do obey God can see his mercy in a way that otherwise would go amiss.

This is why the disobedience becomes a slight positive and one that can be leaned on during the poem.

It shows a way back for those who are human. It is a way to learn about God and his place in the hierarchy from a perspective that would not have been possible in other circumstances.

This is seen throughout the poem and is a big part of why it’s penned.

Mixed in are themes such as light and dark or contemplation to illustrate how the human mind works in the hierarchy.