Our Favorite Poet: Robert Frost

This week’s favorite poet is Robert Frost; a four-time Pulitzer Prize winner, renowned for his work about New England and depicting everyday life of the common man. He was the special guest at President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration and became the unofficial “poet laureate” of The United States

Robert Frost was born on March 26, 1874. During his lifetime he had a ton of failed jobs, dropped out of Harvard and suffered through the deaths of his children and wife. In 1912, Frost published his first book of poetry, which was reviewed favorably other famous poets, Ezra Pound and Edward Thomas. Frost credits Thomas as inspiration for his most famous poem “The Road Not Taken” (seen below). Over the course of his life, he earned more than 40 honorary degrees and won the Pulitzer Prize for his books New Hampshire, Collected Poems, A Further Range and A Witness Tree.

At Kennedy’s inauguration not wanting to slip, trip and fall, he decided to recite a poem he committed to memory, rather than attempt to read the original that he had written. He died on January 29, 1963, from complications related to prostate surgery. His ashes were interred in a family plot in Bennington, Vermont.

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.