Analysis of Whitman’s Famous Poetry

O Captain! my Captain! These famous words have been uttered countless times around the globe, becoming nearly commonplace. However, many do not know their origin — Walt Whitman’s beautiful poem published in his book, Leaves of Grass:

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
                         But O heart! heart! heart!
                            O the bleeding drops of red,
                               Where on the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.
O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
                         Here Captain! dear father!
                            This arm beneath your head!
                               It is some dream that on the deck,
                                 You’ve fallen cold and dead.
My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
                         Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
                            But I with mournful tread,
                               Walk the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.

As well written as this poem may be, it can only be truly appreciated after understanding its meaning. The poem itself is an elegy, or a somber poem reflecting and lamenting on the dead. In this case, it is an elegy to a Captain who recently passed away. Further, it is celebrating the safe return of their ship to its home port. Whitman starts off by describing the hardships at sea, but contrasts this with the cheers of the people on the mainland — celebrating their return. Unfortunately, he then goes on to reveal that the captain lies on the deck, “fallen cold and dead.” In the following stanza, Whitman begs the captain to rise again and witness this splendid scene of joy, joy induced by their successful return. Further, he states that the captain is loved by the masses: “For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning.” Yet, this matters not, as the captain remains dead, albeit it all just feels like “some dream.”

In addition to the aforementioned analysis, many feel that Whitman intended this poem to have a much larger meaning. The poem was written shortly after President Abraham Lincoln’s untimely death, as he was assassinated in a theater by John Wilkes Booth. Thus, it is believed that the captain is a metaphor for Lincoln, who was adored by many. The ship then represents the war-plagued nation, finally freed from the woes of the Civil War. Knowing this, the poem takes on an entirely new, righteous significance. As with many other poets, Whitman’s poetry is best appreciated after an in-depth look.

The Great Mind Behind Wonderful Writings: Who Is Robert M. Drake?

You have probably heard about many great writers who have caught the interest of many people across the world in a hit and run accident. Their unique and creative ways of expressing thoughts in words paved the way for them to be recognized and appreciated by other people. One of the popular names in this field is Robert M. Drake. He has been successful at sharing his thoughts about life and other aspects of life.

Robert M. Drake On Instagram

How did Robert Drake use social media to be one of the best-sellers on Amazon? His story has inspired many people especially those who aspire to become a great writer. He has focused on using Instagram to introduce his works and be a source of strength and motivation to many. R. M. Drake’s work can be seen in the Instagram feeds of many popular celebrities such as Ludacris and the Kardashians.

What makes his works more interesting is that these are set in typewriter font and handmade gray paper. His literary works ruminate death, loneliness, and love. In fact, he has more than one million Instagram followers, about 20, 000 likes on his Facebook account, and 16, 000 Twitter followers.

Robert M. Drake, or Robert Macias, is a self-published writer. Each time he posts his new work, he garners numerous comments and likes. However, the exception of an understated signature which is “r.m. drake” at the bottom. There is a little context given to what these words refer to, where it is originated from and other details about him.

Recently, his book entitled ‘Beautiful Chaos’ is one of the best-selling books in the poetry category of Amazon. His works are the 7th best books in the company Sylvia Plath and Edgar Allan Poe. R. M. Drake sets apart from other famous writers because he did not gain popularity because of a publishing deal but through likes and comments on Instagram.

Drake has started writing at the primary level of his studies. He also worked for a TV company as an art director in Miami. He has gained exposure when he posted excerpts of his unique writings to social media. From then on, he has taken the path of being a self-published writer through various booksellers such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble. With about 4,000 sales per month, his contribution deal helped him leave his job and just focus on his lifelong dream of becoming a full-time commercial writer.

John Keats: A Brief Life

Born on October 31, 1795 in London, John Keats would later go on to become one of the more renowned lyrical poets of his time, joining contemporaries such as Percy Shelley and William Wordsworth in the annals of poetic history – a great accomplishment in and of itself, if not punctuated more so by the short life he lived, passing at the age of 25 years due to tuberculosis. In that time, Keats had published three volumes of poetry and completed works such as “O Solitude” and “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” as well as the epic explorations of Greek mythology, “Endymion” and the posthumously published “Fall of Hyperion.”

The oldest of four children, Keats’ appetite for literature and poetry sprouted at an early age while he was receiving education at Enfield Academy, later to be taken under apprenticeship as an apothecary-surgeon at the age of 15 and studied in a London hospital. Six years later, at the age of 21, Keats was a licensed apothecary, though he never practiced medicine for the rest of his life. His true passion had remained in poetry and its evocative nature.

However, despite how history has held him on a pedestal for his brilliance as a lyrical poet, many within the community of his contemporaries often criticized Keats for his work, labeling him as a “vulgar Cockney poetaster” and degrading his work due to his liberal education compared to their more conservative world views at the time. And while history may sometimes assume that Keats was quite affected by this criticism, the prolificacy that he displayed in the final years of his life might suggest otherwise, particularly in his undertaking of the 4000-line epic, “Endymion.”

While Keats had explored the arenas of politics and social reform in much of his literary work, he is well-remembered for his utility of imagery, of lyric (his Shakespearean sonnets have received notable praise) and especially of his grasp of the human condition – particularly when dealing with terminal beauty as well as suffering and loss, much of which he had braved in his life.

Much of the unknown often explores Keats’ life as one of great hardship, losing his father to horse riding accident at a young age and his mother effectively driving herself from her children’s lives after mishandling family finances. His grandmother eventually turned over matters of the estate to a man named Richard Abbey, who history remembers as miserly and deceitful regarding the family wealth. In fact, it is estimated that, by the time of Keats’ death, Abbey had withheld approximately £2000 from him in a day when even £100 yearly afforded a rather comfortable lifestyle.

Known well for his matters of the heart and the human condition as it relates to suffering, it seems that Keats was fated to experience much of that directly as it related to his family life (the death or loss of his parents and a failed romance with one Fanny Brawne), his finances courtesy of Mr. Abbey, and the backlash of criticism he suffered for his work at the whims of socially disparate counterparts. Yet, despite all that and the misfortune of a short life, Keats was seemingly able to use these experiences to enhance his work and bring to life the evocative nature of poetry that he had spent nearly his entire life daring to explore. Having passed on February 23, 1821 after a trip to Italy, Keats was buried in the Protestant Cemetery in Rome.

Having Fun With Tongue Twisters

Have you ever been sitting around the house with the kids and bored to tears? You don’t want them watching television or playing video games either. You want them to find something to do that is going to keep them entertained and maybe educate them a little. We all know that most kids know that fun and learning is almost always a trap.

However, what if there was a way that we could make them laugh, improve their speech and offer a stronger vocabulary? Thankfully, there is and it comes in the form of fun and exciting tongue twisters.

While a tongue twister may sound like an immense form of pain in your mouth, it could not be further from the truth! In fact, a tongue twister is simply when a group of similar words are placed in a sentence and create a difficult situation for an unexpecting individual. While these tongue twisters are more than willing to give anyone’s speech a run through they will serve up some serious giggles. With that in mind, we thought it would be fun to get you off running with some of our favorite tongue twisters.

Now there are three rules you need to know if you are going to try these. One, you have to say them three times each. Two, you have to say them as fast as possible. And three, you have to laugh!

If you have ever gone to the beach, you more than likely have come across your fair share of seashells. In fact, this is exactly what ha[ppend to poor little Sally one afternoon:

“Sally sells silver sea shells… by the shiny sea shore…
So she can see… the shimmering silver ships”

Where you able to keep up with Sally and her seashells or did your tongue get tied up?

Are Nursery Rhymes Considered Poems

What defines a poem? To many people, it is as simple as writing several lines of words with similar syllable counts and an easily identifiable rhyme scheme. To others, it can be as complex as associating techniques such as internal rhyme or particular cadences, or sometimes it employs no rhyme scheme at all, but emphasizes its content through imagery, clever wordplay and other writing techniques such as symbolism or allegory. Ultimately, it begs the question: are written pieces such as nursery rhymes actually considered poetry?

Many who are more versed in written poetry would be tempted to say that poetry as a whole is a composition of words in prose or verse form (even if that form happens to be blank verse with no real, defined or recognizable structure at all), the end result of an attempt to portray vivid emotions and ideas. Rhymes, arguably, are really only one piece to this puzzle on a general scale, assuming they are even utilized at all (refer to blank verse). Considering there are various types of rhymes and rhyme schemes (when they even exist) that can appear in a wide variety of ways, to argue that a nursery rhyme is on par with ‘legitimate’ poetry might be taken as an insult to some poetry purists.

And while it is true that, by their nature, nursery rhymes in general are not at all complex in either vocabulary, posited ideas or imagery, or even any sort of complicated rhyme scheme (generally, they employ some variant of the easily repetitive a, b, a, b style with the rhyme pairs consistently appearing at the end of lines), the idea that nursery rhymes could qualify as legitimate poetry could very well come down to nothing but personal preference.

With that said, the main element in nursery rhymes is in fact the rhymes themselves. The easily identifiable rhythmic meter is precisely what gives nursery rhymes their unique quality as opposed to being pairs of potentially meaningless, written verse that may or may not have rhyming words coming together at the end of them. Often, nursery rhymes employ few other (if any) poetic techniques for the sake of being simple enough for children to understand. And consider nursery are written primarily for young children. Many young children aren’t interested in or able to identify internal meaning or even many rhyme schemes any more complicated than external rhymes (incorporating words that rhyme at the end of lines), even though other potential rhymes do exist, such as the internal rhyme (in which words within the same line rhyme with each other), the assonantal or consonantal rhymes (which attempt a rhyme scheme by either vowel or consonant sounds respectively rather than an entire syllable), or even alliteration.

So, while it is not necessarily inaccurate to say that nursery rhymes are poetry, it puts a very broad definition to an already broad and sometimes vague topic of discussion in defining poetry. The greatest debate seems to be that nursery rhymes exist primarily to highlight only one technique of written poetry – and only one technique that may or may not even be used consistently within poetry. Very infrequently does a nursery rhyme involve any other poetic qualities besides cadence and overly simplistic rhyme schemes. So, when asked if nursery rhymes are poetry, it’s really only a small corner of poetic possibility that nursery rhymes ever touch upon.